Block ads in Google Chrome in two easy steps

I’m a die-hard Firefox user due to its extensibility and ad blocking. It’s a memory hog and can be a bit sluggish on slower computers. I recently decided to give Google Chrome a try and it’s among the snappiest browsers on the market. Granted, I have no extensions installed so it’s running pretty lean. The first thing I noticed was the dreaded return of ads. Ad Block Plus is one of the most popular Firefox add ons. It’s unknown if Google will permit ad blocking on a large scale with Chrome since Google is one of the world’s largest ad servers. At the moment, there is no Ad Block Plus for Google Chrome but you can block ads with Adsweep in a few simple steps. To enable Adsweep, you have to run the development version of Chrome which enables extensions so this may not be for everyone.

I’m a die-hard Firefox user due to its extensibility and ad blocking. It’s a memory hog and can be a bit sluggish on slower computers. I recently decided to give Google Chrome a try and it’s among the snappiest browsers on the market. Granted, I have no extensions installed so it’s running pretty lean. The first thing I noticed was the dreaded return of ads. Ad Block Plus is one of the most popular Firefox add ons. It’s unknown if Google will permit ad blocking on a large scale with Chrome since Google is one of the world’s largest ad servers. At the moment, there is no Ad Block Plus for Google Chrome but you can block ads with Adsweep in a few simple steps. To enable Adsweep, you have to run the development version of Chrome which enables extensions so this may not be for everyone.

  1. Install Google Chrome from the dev channel. (direct link)
  2. Install Adsweep. (direct link)

When you’re done, close your browser, reopen it and access adsweep.org, you should see a red notification in the upper-right corner of the page (only displayed on adsweep.org), saying AdSweep is installed.

One step forward, two steps back for Ubuntu

I run a triple boot of Ubuntu, Windows XP, and Windows Vista. I am a long time Windows user and decided to give Ubuntu a try. It’s been one pain in the ass after another. This last episode is the last straw. After upgrading to Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala), it failed to update my multiboot screen so ended up running part of one version over another. The sound stopped working again and the touchpad died. I finally figured out I was running an older kernel and updated my GRUB menu which promptly killed my boot option for Windows XP and Vista. Now with the new version running, my touchpad was back and the sound worked but it sounded awful. Then it killed my Rosewill RNX-EasyN1 wireless usb adapter. After some searching, I finally found a temporary fix here under post #19.

I run a triple boot of Ubuntu, Windows XP, and Windows Vista. I am a long time Windows user and decided to give Ubuntu a try. It’s been one pain in the ass after another. This last episode is the last straw. After upgrading to Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala), it failed to update my multiboot screen so ended up running part of one version over another. The sound stopped working again and the touchpad died. I finally figured out I was running an older kernel and updated my GRUB menu which promptly killed my boot option for Windows XP and Vista. Now with the new version running, my touchpad was back and the sound worked but it sounded awful. Then it killed my Rosewill RNX-EasyN1 wireless usb adapter. After some searching, I finally found a temporary fix here under post #19.

What a pain. I done with this experiment. I don’t have time to search for hours to get sound working every time I update the OS. Linux will never be a challenge to Windows or OSX. Goodbye Ubuntu. I won’t be missing you.